Stay Informed
with informative articles, health advice, promotions and more.
Your Name
Your Email
 

What is the link between our diet and eczema?

What is the link between our diet and eczema?

Many people have dealt with at least one skin issue in their life. The majority will probably be the typical breakout of acne associated with puberty.

However, there are many others that exhibit dry, itchy skin which can last for months and months. Eczema is a common problem, especially in babies, and affects around one in three Australians throughout their life, according to Eczema Association Australia.

The symptoms of eczema can seem uncontrollable, with topical ointments, antihistamines and natural remedies providing little to no relief. For many people that come to this dead end in their treatment plan, doctors are likely to then suggest an alternative remedy - changing up your diet.

Eczema is often accompanied by an insatiable itching.Eczema is often accompanied by an insatiable itching.

What is eczema?

To first understand how eczema and diet are linked, it's important to get to know the skin condition first.

It is unknown why some people get eczema and others don't, but this is a skin condition that seems to affects infants more. Once they are older, it's common to 'grow out of' the condition. However, those with eczema are likely to develop other allergies, such as hayfever and asthma - these three are closely interlinked with genetics and are called the 'allergy trio'.

The symptoms of eczema range far and wide on the skin. Mild concerns are just itching, but when untreated, it can manifest as painful rashes that progresses to oozing, cracked and extremely dry skin.

There are many treatments for eczema, thankfully. The first is to avoid all allergens that can trigger it - these can be pollen (which also affects hayfever and asthma), dust, cold weather, humidity, wool material and cigarette smoke.

For others, eczema can come hand-in-hand with food allergies, and so, a healthy diet void of allergens can also help to clear the skin up.

What foods should you avoid if you have eczema?

Firstly, it's important to establish that you may not necessarily have a food allergy if you have eczema. If your skin isn't clearing up despite your efforts, the first thing you should do is go see a medical professional. They can take a blood test to determine if any food allergies are present, and advise you from there.

A few common food allergies for eczema could include:

  • Dairy products
  • Eggs
  • Nuts
  • Soy
  • Wheat
  • Fish

A blood test or allergen test could tell you exactly which foods you may be allergic too, but sometimes the results can come up with false positives. The best way to determine an allergen, how it affects you and the extent of it is trial and error - unless you have tested severely allergic to a substance, such as nuts.

Milk is a common culprit of an eczema food allergy.Milk is a common culprit of an eczema food allergy.

Food allergies with eczema are a delayed allergic reaction. Your eczema will only flare up a few hours to a few days after you have ingested the food in question. Just note that breathing troubles aren't allergic reactions related to eczema, and should be treated more seriously, as they can cause anaphylactic shock.

To test food substances, you need to start with an elimination diet. This involves removing all possible allergens, and cleansing your system. Eat only the simplest healthy foods, and avoid as many processed products as possible.

One by one, introduce new foods to your diet and see how your skin reacts. You should give each new ingredient around a week after incorporation into your diet to make sure that your body has enough time to process and respond to it.

If your skin does exhibit the symptoms of an eczema outbreak, use topical ointments for relief and wait until your skin has cleared before introducing other new foods.

Starting a diet from a blank slate can be difficult, but can provide much-needed relief for your eczema.Starting a diet from a blank slate can be difficult, but can provide much-needed relief for your eczema.

What foods are fine to eat if you have eczema?

Of course, when starting with a fresh, healthy diet free of possible allergens, you need to first know what you can start on.

Whilst you can't drink milk, there are many alternatives readily available. Rice milk is recommended by doctors over soy or almond milk, as those two can sometimes worsen your eczema symptoms.

You may also be able to find A2 milk, which has the full, creamy flavour of regular milk, but doesn't have one of the main proteins (A1) that people are commonly intolerant or allergic to. This means that it contains the same amount of lactose as you would normally get with milk that contains both the A1 and A2 proteins.

The foods you'll need to increase are carbohydrates (not the refined variety) such as those found in whole grains, fruits and vegetables. To relieve the stress on your kidney and system, you also need to drink ample amounts of water, helping to flush out those toxins so your body can focus on recovery of eczema symptoms.

It does take a lot of time and patience, and as anyone on a diet can tell you, also plenty of dedication. Eating healthy will also help many other functions of your body, both physically and mentally, and will help you to establish a good habit for your future.

Post New Comment

What is the link between our diet and eczema?

Many people have dealt with at least one skin issue in their life. The majority will probably be the typical breakout of acne associated with puberty.

However, there are many others that exhibit dry, itchy skin which can last for months and months. Eczema is a common problem, especially in babies, and affects around one in three Australians throughout their life, according to Eczema Association Australia.

The symptoms of eczema can seem uncontrollable, with topical ointments, antihistamines and natural remedies providing little to no relief. For many people that come to this dead end in their treatment plan, doctors are likely to then suggest an alternative remedy - changing up your diet.

Eczema is often accompanied by an insatiable itching.Eczema is often accompanied by an insatiable itching.

What is eczema?

To first understand how eczema and diet are linked, it's important to get to know the skin condition first.

It is unknown why some people get eczema and others don't, but this is a skin condition that seems to affects infants more. Once they are older, it's common to 'grow out of' the condition. However, those with eczema are likely to develop other allergies, such as hayfever and asthma - these three are closely interlinked with genetics and are called the 'allergy trio'.

The symptoms of eczema range far and wide on the skin. Mild concerns are just itching, but when untreated, it can manifest as painful rashes that progresses to oozing, cracked and extremely dry skin.

There are many treatments for eczema, thankfully. The first is to avoid all allergens that can trigger it - these can be pollen (which also affects hayfever and asthma), dust, cold weather, humidity, wool material and cigarette smoke.

For others, eczema can come hand-in-hand with food allergies, and so, a healthy diet void of allergens can also help to clear the skin up.

What foods should you avoid if you have eczema?

Firstly, it's important to establish that you may not necessarily have a food allergy if you have eczema. If your skin isn't clearing up despite your efforts, the first thing you should do is go see a medical professional. They can take a blood test to determine if any food allergies are present, and advise you from there.

A few common food allergies for eczema could include:

  • Dairy products
  • Eggs
  • Nuts
  • Soy
  • Wheat
  • Fish

A blood test or allergen test could tell you exactly which foods you may be allergic too, but sometimes the results can come up with false positives. The best way to determine an allergen, how it affects you and the extent of it is trial and error - unless you have tested severely allergic to a substance, such as nuts.

Milk is a common culprit of an eczema food allergy.Milk is a common culprit of an eczema food allergy.

Food allergies with eczema are a delayed allergic reaction. Your eczema will only flare up a few hours to a few days after you have ingested the food in question. Just note that breathing troubles aren't allergic reactions related to eczema, and should be treated more seriously, as they can cause anaphylactic shock.

To test food substances, you need to start with an elimination diet. This involves removing all possible allergens, and cleansing your system. Eat only the simplest healthy foods, and avoid as many processed products as possible.

One by one, introduce new foods to your diet and see how your skin reacts. You should give each new ingredient around a week after incorporation into your diet to make sure that your body has enough time to process and respond to it.

If your skin does exhibit the symptoms of an eczema outbreak, use topical ointments for relief and wait until your skin has cleared before introducing other new foods.

Starting a diet from a blank slate can be difficult, but can provide much-needed relief for your eczema.Starting a diet from a blank slate can be difficult, but can provide much-needed relief for your eczema.

What foods are fine to eat if you have eczema?

Of course, when starting with a fresh, healthy diet free of possible allergens, you need to first know what you can start on.

Whilst you can't drink milk, there are many alternatives readily available. Rice milk is recommended by doctors over soy or almond milk, as those two can sometimes worsen your eczema symptoms.

You may also be able to find A2 milk, which has the full, creamy flavour of regular milk, but doesn't have one of the main proteins (A1) that people are commonly intolerant or allergic to. This means that it contains the same amount of lactose as you would normally get with milk that contains both the A1 and A2 proteins.

The foods you'll need to increase are carbohydrates (not the refined variety) such as those found in whole grains, fruits and vegetables. To relieve the stress on your kidney and system, you also need to drink ample amounts of water, helping to flush out those toxins so your body can focus on recovery of eczema symptoms.

It does take a lot of time and patience, and as anyone on a diet can tell you, also plenty of dedication. Eating healthy will also help many other functions of your body, both physically and mentally, and will help you to establish a good habit for your future.

What is the link between our diet and eczema?
Stay Informed
If you loved this article and want to hear more from us, sign up to our monthly e-newsletter
Your Name
Your Email

Similar Articles

Date:1:49 p.m. Friday, 5 February 2016

3 myths and misconceptions about gluten debunked

3 myths and misconceptions about gluten debunked

Date:3:12 p.m. Monday, 21 December 2015

Five foods that can lead to bloating

Five foods that can lead to bloating

Date:10:27 a.m. Tuesday, 1 December 2015

Does insulin play a role in the foods we choose to eat?

Does insulin play a role in the foods we choose to eat?